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I always had a passion to build things on my on with code, and even though i went to a bootcamp, i still proclaim myself, for the most part as self taught developer. Being a self taught developer has pros such as developing in the developer grit, perseverance, dedication, determination, and learning through the only real method of learning, doing(building/coding). The cons of being a self taught developer is that you may lack the key foundations that a developer with a CS degree, learns through formal education.

So here are some things I’ve learning while being a Junior Developer

Table…

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Url: https://leetcode.com/problems/single-number/

Description

Given a non-empty array of integers nums, every element appears twice except for one. Find that single one.

Follow up: Could you implement a solution with a linear runtime complexity and without using extra memory?

Example 1

Input: nums = [2,2,1]
Output: 1

Example 2

Input: nums = [4,1,2,1,2]
Output: 4

Example 3

Input: nums = [1]
Output: 1

Constraints

  • 1 <= nums.length <= 3 * 104
  • -3 * 104 <= nums[i] <= 3 * 104
  • Each element in the array appears twice except for one element which appears only once.

Solution:

Steps

1. Create a object to keep…

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Description

Given a string s and an integer array indices of the same length.

The string s will be shuffled such that the character at the ith position moves to indices[i] in the shuffled string.

Return the shuffled string.

Example 1

Input: s = "codeleet", indices = [4,5,6,7,0,2,1,3]
Output: "leetcode"
Explanation: As shown, "codeleet" becomes "leetcode" after shuffling.

Example 2

Input: s = "abc", indices = [0,1,2]
Output: "abc"
Explanation: After shuffling, each character remains in its position.

Example 3

Input: s = "aiohn", indices = [3,1,4,2,0]
Output: "nihao"

Constraints

  • s.length == indices.length == n
  • 1 <= n <= 100
  • s


Description

You own a Goal Parser that can interpret a string command. The command consists of an alphabet of "G", "()" and/or "(al)" in some order. The Goal Parser will interpret "G" as the string "G", "()" as the string "o", and "(al)" as the string "al". The interpreted strings are then concatenated in the original order.

Given the string command, return the Goal Parser's interpretation of command.

Example 1

Input: command = "G()(al)"
Output: "Goal"
Explanation: The Goal Parser interprets the command as follows:
G -> G
() -> o
(al) -> al
The final concatenated result is "Goal".

Example…


LeagueSpx logo
LeagueSpx logo

Today we’re going to be building a league sponsorship service that is built with Node.js, Express, Sequelize, Postgres, PostGis , and Deployed to Heroku. We will also be building the frontend to our application, in another article, and it will be built with Angular, Bootstrap then be deployed to S3.

Overview

The purpose of this application is to enable brands to find leagues to sponsor, and leagues to join our platform, to potentially receive sponsorship .Our application will initially only have two endpoints, in part one. …

Will Sheppard

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